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brittan

Discovery at 21

222 posts in this topic

A couple of weeks ago I posted in the "What's everyone driving?" thread that my old Discovery had passed its 19th MoT test despite my misgivings over the condition of the body frame. I knew that the rear body cross-member (joins to the rear floor and is the sill for the rear door) was not good and so I bought a replacement part a week ago.

 

My next move was to carry out a check to see what other parts, if any, that I needed to buy to effect repairs and today was the day for that check.

 

I've stripped out all the seats, carpet and trim panels behind the front seats and given all the suspect areas a severe test with an old screwdriver and a hammer. The results are not good but at least I know why I couldn't cure the damp carpet despite re-sealing the alpine windows.

 

 

The left hand side here shows lots of fresh air. The wheel well and the flat panel behind it are available as repair panels but there's nothing for the vertical part of the inner body frame so I'm going to have to use my bestest metal bashing skills to make something. Not easy.

IMG_3173_zpsb2940cac.jpg

 

 

 

I'd done a small repair in this area behind the driver's seat about 10 years ago but the repair was now surrounded by nothing but rust. That's a large hole, very awkward to make repair parts for and close to the seat belt mount point. You can also see the gaping hole in the floor about half way along the wheel well and the rusted floor in that area. The centre section of the floor was replaced 10 years ago.

IMG_3181_zps407bc844.jpg

 

 

 

It's the same on the passenger side and the wheel well is badly holed too.

IMG_3183_zps3bde4853.jpg

 

 

 

The left hand side again and showing the matching hole in the floor half way along the wheel well.

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Tomorrow I will be doing the same sort of 'testing to the side sills. Repair sections are available but again it's no easy job.

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How much did you bung the MOT tester :)

Looking forward to seeing your handy work.

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Not that much progress today.

 

When I removed the rear seats 3 of the bolts sheared in their welded in nuts so I drilled them out and ran a tap down all those bolt holes.

 

The after-market steel sills are now off - two of the fixing points on each side use the body mount bolts and they took some undoing. One of those jobs where it would have been useful to have been born with three arms. That allowed me good access to the body sills so I gave them a good structural load testing with a hammer. Good news and bad news: the major part of the sills, which I had repaired 10 years ago where they had rusted at the raised seam on the bottom, was sound. The ends were a bit flakey but nothing major so I'll get some flat steel sheet and fold some repair sections.

 

A few other parts which will be taken off tomorrow have had their fasteners soaked in penetrating oil and the rear number plate was loose so I've stuck that back on firmly.

 

Apart from that I made a visit to a tool shop but I was a reasonably good boy and didn't buy too much.

 

I've more or less now got the full list of what repair panels and sheet steel I need so those will be ordered tomorrow.

 

The fuel tank will have to come out for some of the work but it still has about 10 galleons of diesel in it. I've used some today but there's a way to go. The difference in weight with all the seats and trim out is very noticeable but with all the "ventilation" driving on wet roads results in road spray on the inside!! :yessmiley:

 

 

New tools - luuurvly:

IMG_3188_zps25c81e82.jpg

 

 

 

New body rear cross member:

IMG_3191_zps6003861e.jpg

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Loving this thread. Keep them coming.

 

I particularly like that you tested the structural integrity of the panels with a hammer. Perhaps this is the right way to do it, but I had visions of Jeremy Clarkson helping you out there. :D

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Today was mostly spent sourcing some of the parts required. Two on-line orders done from two different suppliers and some parts collected from my local independent LR spares supplier.

I also picked up some sheet steel, red oxide paint (red lead stuff was killed of by the safety elf), spray on underseal and a new visor for my face shield. Nice to see what you are doing when waving a grinder about.

The other bits are the boot floor (in the cardboard covers), floor side pieces and floor supports.

 

IMG_3198_zps5815ca95.jpg

 

While talking to the parts chap I noticed that his book of repair panels included the vertical sides parts. They appear to be genuine LR ones but are no longer available from LR so the parts man is going to see if he can find one of his suppliers who has them loafing on a shelf, getting in the way and who will pay me to take them away. Well, something like that.

 

 

While that search takes place I won't start cutting anything apart just yet. Instead I've started to remove all the "armour plating" from the Discovery as I've decided to get all of them shot blasted and then hot-dip galvanised. There's just the front bumper still to remove and that needs a little repair/modification before taking the lot to the galvaniser man next week. The plan is that they will be doing their bit while I'm away so it will all be ready for me on my return.

I might try to weigh all the parts - the sills are 3mm steel and the rest is 5 or 6mm steel so they're darned heavy!

IMG_3203_zpsbebcebe8.jpg

 

 

 

I said before that the rear body cross member was a mess and I bought a replacement one without seeing how bad the original is. With the rear bumper and the plastic cover off it's bad bad. I didn't bother testing this bit with the hammer - it failed the finger poke test. The chassis, which you can see the open ends of the main rails, is absolutely fine.

IMG_3207_zps5313ba20.jpg

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Fascinating thread, thanks B, will follow with interest.

 

With all the rusty elements, can you make it safe and roadworthy? Is there no concern that if you had a hefty collision with something solid that it might disintegrate or shear in places you don't expect?

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