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Bianchi crash .... video


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#1 Snake Pliskin

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 06:51 AM

This is rather uncomfortable to watch but really shows the intensity and speed of the crash.

Fingers crossed for his recovery.




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#2 FinFerNan

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 07:03 AM

Fingers crossed for him. Sadly its not looking too good  :no


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#3 mighTy Tee

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 07:37 AM

Pretty horrific, especially as it was behind the safety car, the speed of impact seems very high and that recovery tractor is moved massively by the inertia of the impact.

 

The problem with the impact is the F1 car is designed to take the impact with an obstacle at ground level, unfortunately Jules Bianchi went under the vehicle and it looks like his head will have taken a major impact.


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#4 Snake Pliskin

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 07:43 AM

Agree with all the above comments Guys.

 

Horrific to see this footage and does make you fear the worst knowing the F1 car went under, lifted and moved the jcb.

 

The under carriage of the jcb ripped off the top section of the car, so this suggests Bianchi's head hit the same - amazing he's alive at all !


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#5 sTTu

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 08:27 AM

I agree, Snake. I can't imagine his helmet could survive a blow like that.

 

At times like this I am glad I am not him, a member of his family or the person who had to decide whether to abandon the race earlier. I read that Massa was saying it should have been stopped 5 laps earlier. But then no-one was on full wets that I recall.

 

 

 


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#6 Snake Pliskin

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 08:33 AM

yes mate ... the conditions changed significantly and got to the point where wet tyres were really needed - both cars that came off at this corner were on inters at the time.


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#7 brittan

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 10:53 AM

That's a lot of energy carried by Bianchi's car into the impact.  The JCB is lifted and moved significantly.   The video also shows that as the rear of the JCB is lifted the strops holding Sutil's car either break or become detached and the car drops to the ground.

 

There are some comments that it's odd that the green flag is being waved from the marshal tower but this would be correct if double waved yellows were still being displayed at the preceding marshal post, ie drivers must slow and exercise caution at the yellows and allowed to regain racing speed after the green flag.

 

Bianchi's condition is reported as critical but stable.  I expect it will be a while before any prognosis is given. 

Massa took a long time to recover from his head injury and that was from "only" an escaped spring.

 

Not deploying the safety car for recovery of Sutil's car was Charlie Whiting's sole decision.   I wonder how he feels?


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#8 Arne

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 12:01 PM

It does not look good, but I hope I am wrong this time.

 

Fingers crossed.


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#9 Snake Pliskin

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 01:34 PM

I am sure Charlie Whiting feels pretty $hit - but to be fair, this really was a freak accident and culmination of bad factors all coming together.

Not saying Whiting was right or wrong - there are many factors to analyse here and probably a number of things to be learned and changed in F1 moving forward ....

 

* will closed cock pits be fast tracked now do we think ?

* should safety cars be deployed before cars are recovered from the side of the track by jcb's or similar

* should F1 invest in a number of cranes to be used at each circuit with sufficient reach so they don't have to enter the track confines 


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#10 brittan

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Posted 07 October 2014 - 02:12 PM

My comment wasn't meant to criticise Charlie Whiting, simply emphasise that just one man makes that sort of decision on the hoof - and in a fast changing situation I don't really see how it can be any other way.

I expect the guide lines will change though.

 

I think Niki Lauda's comment is pretty apt; we forget that motor racing is a dangerous sport.  In Lauda's time driver injury and worse happened quite often; in more recent years with the advent of proper safety regulations covering the car build and circuit facilities it's common to see a driver have a monumental shunt yet walk away from it.

When something like Bianchi's crash occurs there will always be some soul searching to see what could have prevented it or mitigated against the consequences but it will never be possible to eliminate all the risks and motor racing will remain a dangerous sport, to some degree, for all involved.

 

* closed cockpits: I think they have been under discussion/development since 2009 and Massa's accident.  Not sure how these are viewed by the drivers and I think there are issues with achieving the minimum time for driver extraction.

* Deploying the safety car:  I'd guess that that will remain an on-the-hoof decision by the race director rather than a mandatory action.  It has to balance driver/marshal safety against unnecessary disruption to the race.  Someone large, Italian and with silver hair could use mandatory safety car deployment as a team tactic.

 

* They would have to be very big cranes to give sufficient reach that you could confidently do away with mobile recovery vehicles.  Bernie would insist that the track owners pay for it.

 

* I think mobile recovery vehicles will always be required in some form at all tracks, perhaps in combination with more permanent crane installations.  Maybe the type of vehicle needs to be more carefully considered to use something other than a building site refugee.

Under-run bars?  Outside crash structures like you see on roadworks cone lorries? 


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